Happy Shark Week! One of the best weeks of the year is here and we could not be more excited.

All week long we have been celebrating Shark Week on our social channels by awarding some of our favorite sharks some shark-tastic titles. Scroll down to catch them all and be sure to tag @aqualungdivers in your favorite shark photos.

πŸ† 🦈 πŸ’¨
The fastest shark

Shortfin Mako Shark

First off, the Shortfin Mako Shark, also known as the cheetah of the ocean. It has been clocked at over 30 mph (48 kph). That’s a half a mile a minute. Could you imagine swimming that fast? Just, WOW.

πŸ† 🦈 πŸ‘΅πŸ½β 
The oldest shark

Greenland Shark

In 2016, researchers published a study and analysis of 28 female Greenland Sharks where they reported findings that the sharks were at least 272 years old and could potentially be as old as 512 years old, thus making them THE OLDEST SHARK SPECIES.

This photo was taken by Arctic Marine Biologist @ericstemarie, who assists in the tagging of Greenland sharks in the Arctic. Tagging efforts help the team study the sharks’ behavior, estimate their energy demands, and understand how increases in Arctic temperatures and commercial fishing affect the sharks and their ecosystem. The ultimate goal is to aid in a conservation strategy.

πŸ† 🦈 🎈
The shark with the most gill slits

Sevengill Shark

While most sharks only have 5 gill slits, some have 6 and only two sharks have 7; the Broadnose Sevengill & Sharpnose Sevengill. While they share a similar name and number of gills, these sharks live somewhat different lifestyles. The Sharpnose Sevengill is generally a deepwater shark that prefers the continental and island shelves of the tropical and temperate seas. The Broadnose Sevengill is more of a coastal species that prefers temperate water conditions and is often found in shallow bays and coves.

πŸ“· : @underwaterpaparazzi

πŸ† πŸ‹ 🦈
The biggest shark

Whale Shark

No surprise here, the filter-feeding Whale Shark is the largest of all living sharks. It can reach lengths of 40+ feet (12 m) and 20.6 tons. The largest recorded whale shark was 62 feet (18.8 m) long.

Looking for a chance to meet one of these gentle giants in person? They are some of the widest migrating sharks in the world and can be found in a number of tropical areas including Indonesia, Ecuador, Mozambique, Maldives, Australia, Tanzania, the Philippines, Mexico, Honduras, and, sometimes, Hawaii.

πŸ“· : Aqua Lung ambassadors and conservationists, @seethroughsea, in Kona, Hawaii.

πŸ† 🦈 πŸ“
The smallest shark

Dwarf Lantern Shark

There are actually a few in the running for the smallest shark, including the Spined Pygmy Shark, and the Pygmy Ribbontail Catshark, but the Dwarf Lantern Shark holds the trophy at this time, reaching a maximum of about 8 inches (20 cm).

Another fun fact about these cute sharks: they have bio-luminescent properties on their bellies (hence the name β€œlantern shark”) that help them hunt and navigate the deep waters in which they reside.

πŸ“· : sharkuniversity.org

πŸ† 🦈 😎
Coolest hunting style

Thresher Shark

The Thresher Shark is known for its exceptionally long tail that can grow to half the length of its body. As scientists have long suspected, that long tail has more use than just looks. The Thresher shark has recently been observed using their tails like stun guns to whip and either stun or kill their prey, allowing them to come back and eat at their leisure. Even more resourceful, a single tail-slap would sometimes result in capturing 7 fish! That’s why we’re giving it the title of Coolest Hunting Style.

πŸ“· : @pipatcat

πŸ† 🦈 πŸ’€
The laziest shark

Nurse Shark

The Nurse Shark, aka the β€œcouch potato of the ocean world” has a relatively inactive lifestyle, thus earning it the title of LAZIEST SHARK.

This shark is generally found in shallow, warmer waters, resting all day long at the bottom of the ocean, often in groups of up to 40 sharks (this is also one of few sharks who do not need to keep swimming to breathe, thus allowing it to maintain its sedentary life). The way the Nurse Shark hunts is even a little lazy compared to other sharks; it scans the bottom and catches prey by sucking it into its mouth.

πŸ“· : @gadormuntat

πŸ† 🦈
The cutest shark

Horn Shark

We're finishing off our #sharkweek extravaganza with the Cutest Shark award, and this goes to the Horn Shark. Yes, we know this is 100% subjective, but LOOK HOW CUTE IT IS! JUST LOOK AT IT!

They also take the award for coolest looking egg. Horn Shark eggs are a spiral, auger shape that get tucked into rock crevices and tight spaces until they hatch.

πŸ“· : @underwaterpaparazzi

Happy Shark Week! One of the best weeks of the year is here and we could not be more excited.

All week long we have been celebrating Shark Week on our social channels by awarding some of our favorite sharks some shark-tastic titles. Scroll down to catch them all and be sure to tag @aqualungdivers in your favorite shark photos.

πŸ† 🦈 πŸ’¨
The fastest shark

Shortfin Mako Shark

First off, the Shortfin Mako Shark, also known as the cheetah of the ocean. It has been clocked at over 30 mph (48 kph). That’s a half a mile a minute. Could you imagine swimming that fast? Just, WOW.

πŸ† 🦈 πŸ‘΅πŸ½β 
The oldest shark

Greenland Shark

In 2016, researchers published a study and analysis of 28 female Greenland Sharks where they reported findings that the sharks were at least 272 years old and could potentially be as old as 512 years old, thus making them THE OLDEST SHARK SPECIES.

This photo was taken by Arctic Marine Biologist @ericstemarie, who assists in the tagging of Greenland sharks in the Arctic. Tagging efforts help the team study the sharks’ behavior, estimate their energy demands, and understand how increases in Arctic temperatures and commercial fishing affect the sharks and their ecosystem. The ultimate goal is to aid in a conservation strategy.

πŸ† 🦈 🎈
The shark with the most gill slits

Sevengill Shark

While most sharks only have 5 gill slits, some have 6 and only two sharks have 7; the Broadnose Sevengill & Sharpnose Sevengill. While they share a similar name and number of gills, these sharks live somewhat different lifestyles. The Sharpnose Sevengill is generally a deepwater shark that prefers the continental and island shelves of the tropical and temperate seas. The Broadnose Sevengill is more of a coastal species that prefers temperate water conditions and is often found in shallow bays and coves.

πŸ“· : @underwaterpaparazzi

πŸ† πŸ‹ 🦈
The biggest shark

Whale Shark

No surprise here, the filter-feeding Whale Shark is the largest of all living sharks. It can reach lengths of 40+ feet (12 m) and 20.6 tons. The largest recorded whale shark was 62 feet (18.8 m) long.

Looking for a chance to meet one of these gentle giants in person? They are some of the widest migrating sharks in the world and can be found in a number of tropical areas including Indonesia, Ecuador, Mozambique, Maldives, Australia, Tanzania, the Philippines, Mexico, Honduras, and, sometimes, Hawaii.

πŸ“· : Aqua Lung ambassadors and conservationists, @seethroughsea, in Kona, Hawaii.

πŸ† 🦈 πŸ“
The smallest shark

Dwarf Lantern Shark

There are actually a few in the running for the smallest shark, including the Spined Pygmy Shark, and the Pygmy Ribbontail Catshark, but the Dwarf Lantern Shark holds the trophy at this time, reaching a maximum of about 8 inches (20 cm).

Another fun fact about these cute sharks: they have bio-luminescent properties on their bellies (hence the name β€œlantern shark”) that help them hunt and navigate the deep waters in which they reside.

πŸ“· : sharkuniversity.org

πŸ† 🦈 😎
Coolest hunting style

Thresher Shark

The Thresher Shark is known for its exceptionally long tail that can grow to half the length of its body. As scientists have long suspected, that long tail has more use than just looks. The Thresher shark has recently been observed using their tails like stun guns to whip and either stun or kill their prey, allowing them to come back and eat at their leisure. Even more resourceful, a single tail-slap would sometimes result in capturing 7 fish! That’s why we’re giving it the title of Coolest Hunting Style.

πŸ“· : @pipatcat

πŸ† 🦈 πŸ’€
The laziest shark

Nurse Shark

The Nurse Shark, aka the β€œcouch potato of the ocean world” has a relatively inactive lifestyle, thus earning it the title of LAZIEST SHARK.

This shark is generally found in shallow, warmer waters, resting all day long at the bottom of the ocean, often in groups of up to 40 sharks (this is also one of few sharks who do not need to keep swimming to breathe, thus allowing it to maintain its sedentary life). The way the Nurse Shark hunts is even a little lazy compared to other sharks; it scans the bottom and catches prey by sucking it into its mouth.

πŸ“· : @gadormuntat

πŸ† 🦈
The cutest shark

Horn Shark

We're finishing off our #sharkweek extravaganza with the Cutest Shark award, and this goes to the Horn Shark. Yes, we know this is 100% subjective, but LOOK HOW CUTE IT IS! JUST LOOK AT IT!

They also take the award for coolest looking egg. Horn Shark eggs are a spiral, auger shape that get tucked into rock crevices and tight spaces until they hatch.

πŸ“· : @underwaterpaparazzi

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